Thursday, 18 March 2010

When I am dead and opened, you will find Penelope Keith written on my heart.

A couple of good new graffiti seen this week. Intriguing, rather than funny. One, in a pub near Oxford Circus:

'I am a Turkish Man.'

Now, obviously I realise that there's an unsavoury explanation for why someone might write that in a pub loo - but this was the whole message. No phone number, no date or time. Which is what makes me hope this wasn't an advertisement, it was simply an act of self-expression. Maybe even self-affirmation. 'Whatever else they say, Hasim, they can't take away who you are. Yeah, write it on the wall. Write it big, write it proud. Let the whole world know. I... am a Turkish Man.'

The other, in a pub near Old Street. (No, I'm not always in the pub. Yes, I am sometimes in the pub.)

'Routledge till I die.'

Well, this one isn't really intriguing any more, because spoilsport Google informs me that the author was probably swearing a solemn oath of eternal allegiance to Wayne...


... and not, as I originally assumed, Patricia.

5 comments:

Jessica said...

I believe you were probably right the first time... Patricia 'til i die! I have seen the little "you tube" clip of you... where you were in the pub. You can't hide. We know that's where you live!

I can confirm I am definitely not a Turkish man. Nor a Turkish woman for that matter.

logopetria said...

I think your second writer has just sold his soul for a long term publishing contract. That graffiti may be the last freely-distributed thing he'll ever write.

Stu said...

It's not that you spend too long in the pub which concerns me, it's just time spend in the toilets scrutinising the small print.

Perhaps a small game of "JF woz 'ere" might be an interesting side line. We could follow your route through the watering holes of the Capital and get to enjoy the wall-art that you discover along the way?

Then again, maybe not ...

Amanda Prefect said...

I suppose we're all safe as long as it isn't Paul Routledge.

Anonymous said...

The refrain ending in "till i die" is usually sung by football fans toward their beloved side - never an individual player. So it is with this graffito, which in fact may refer to the prestigious publisher of academic monographs - originally named "George Routledge & Son", previously located in London, since decamped to a souless industrial park near Didcot. Publishing rag The Bookseller gave the game away in 2004.